Sunday, February 8, 2015

So much fail

Notice the CREDENTIALED reporters only allowed?

This arrived on the 8th.  

So much fail here I'm just gonna post the entire thing and let you see what the Lords of DC have been up to


News Alert: TODAY: Press Call on EPA Proposed FY 2016 Budget
TODAY: Press Call on EPA Proposed FY 2016 Budget
Release Date: 02/02/2015
Contact Information: Robert Daguillard (NEWS MEDIA ONLY), daguillard.robert@epa.gov, 202-564-6618, 202-360-0476

WASHINGTON – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Acting Deputy Administrator Stan Meiburg will hold a press calltoday at 2:00 PM EST to announce the Obama Administration’s Fiscal Year 2016 EPA budget, laying out a strategy to make the investments needed to meet the Agency’s mission to protect public health and the environment.

WHEN
: Monday, February 2, at 2:00 p.m. EST 

WHO
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Acting Deputy Administrator Stan Meiburg 

WHAT
: EPA Proposed FY 2016 Budget press call

RSVP
: Members of the media interested in participating should dial in ten minutes prior to the beginning of the call at 877-887-8949 and give the conference ID number 78785024. The name of the call is the EPA Budget Press Call.

Conference ID
78785024
Conference Name
: EPA Budget Press Call

***THIS CALL IS FOR CREDENTIALED NEWS MEDIA ONLY***
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News Release: EPA's FY 2016 Budget Proposal Increases Support for Communities to Deliver Core Environmental and Health Protections
Contact:
Robert Daguillard (News Media Only)
daguillard.robert@epa.gov
202-564-6618
Brooke Hanson (Public Inquiries Only)
ocfoinfo@epa.gov
202-564-0037
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 2, 2015
EPA's FY 2016 Budget Proposal Increases Support for Communities to Deliver Core Environmental and Health Protections

WASHINGTON – The Obama Administration Fiscal Year 2016 budget announced today for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lays out a strategy to ensure that all Americans benefit from the economic recovery we are seeing today. The proposed EPA FY 2016 budget of $8.6 billion provides resources vital to that overarching vision and the request is $452 million above the agency’s enacted level for FY 2015.
“This budget sends a strong signal that the President is fully committed to making the investments needed to meet our mission to protect public health and the environment.  The funding allows us to further our important work to combat the impacts of climate change and deliver on the President’s Climate Action Plan while improving air quality, protecting our water, executing rigorous scientific research and ensuring the public safety from toxic chemicals,” said Stan Meiburg, EPA Acting Deputy Administrator.  “At the center of our work is collaborating with our state, local, and tribal partners and working with business, industry, and stakeholders to find commonsense solutions to complex environmental issues and work toward a sustainable future for all Americans through effective use of the public resources entrusted to us.”

Fiscal Year 2016 budget highlights include
:

Making a Visible Difference in Communities Across the Country
A key element of EPA’s FY 2016 efforts will be coordination with other federal agencies, states, tribes, and stakeholders. This coordination will help to focus the work of diverse programs across the agency at the community level. In response to feedback from across the country, this budget proposes a multifaceted effort to enable communities of all sizes, rural and urban, to find needed assistance and support for capacity building, planning, and implementation of environmental protection programs.
In addition to new cross-program efforts, including 20 full time equivalents for Community Resource Coordinators, $2 million for Circuit Riders, and $5 million to coordinate efforts at the local level in overburdened and vulnerable communities, the budget provides for targeted community efforts in each of the program areas.  These efforts, highlighted in more detail in the subsequent sections, will include helping communities adopt green infrastructure, providing technical assistance for building resilience and adapting to climate change, and helping communities to reduce environmental impacts through advanced monitoring technology and decision making tools.

Addressing Climate Change and Improving Air Quality
The FY 2016 budget prioritizes actions to reduce the impacts of climate change, one of the most significant challenges for this and future generations, and supports the President’s Climate Action Plan. EPA’s FY 2016 Budget includes $239 million for efforts to cut carbon pollution and other greenhouse gases through commonsense standards, guidelines, and voluntary programs. The EPA’s Clean Power Plan, which establishes carbon pollution reduction standards for existing power plants, is a top priority for the EPA and will help spur innovation and economic growth while creating a clean energy economy. Finalizing and implementing these regulations will involve innovative approaches and flexibility for achieving solutions, as well as extensive and unprecedented work with states, tribes, and territories, which is why this budget includes additional funding for states. In addition to EPA’s discretionary budget, the President also proposes a $4 billion Clean Power State Incentive Fund, a mandatory account to be administered by the EPA that supports state efforts to go above and beyond their carbon pollution reduction goals in the power sector.
Working with the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, the EPA will also develop Phase 2 greenhouse gas and fuel efficiency standards for heavy-duty vehicles. These standards will represent significant savings at the pump, reduce carbon pollution, and reduce fuel costs for businesses, which is anticipated to lower prices for consumers.

Protecting the Nation’s Waters
Protecting America’s water resources is critical to EPA’s mission, so the agency will continue to build upon decades of efforts to ensure our waterways are clean and our drinking water is safe because there are far reaching effects when rivers, lakes, and oceans becomes polluted. They can endanger wildlife, make our drinking water unsafe and threaten the waters where we swim and fish. Building on the strong funding level of $2.3 billion provided through the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds, $50 million is included for technical assistance, training, and other efforts to enhance the capacity of communities and states to plan and finance drinking water and wastewater infrastructure improvements. In January 2015, the agency launched a key component of this expanded effort, the Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center. It will help communities across the country focus on financial planning for future public infrastructure investments, expanding work with states to identify financing opportunities for rural communities, and enhancing partnership and collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on training, technical assistance, and funding opportunities in rural areas. The Water Infrastructure and Resilience Finance center is part of the Build America investment initiative, a government-wide effort to increase infrastructure investment and promote economic growth by creating opportunities for state and local governments and the private sector to collaborate on infrastructure development.

Taking Steps to Improve Chemical Facility Safety 
In support of the White House Executive Order to Improve Chemical Facility Safety and Security, the EPA is requesting $27.8 million for the State and Local Prevention and Preparedness program, an increase of $12 million above the FY 2015 enacted level. This increase will allow EPA to continue to improve the safety and security of chemical facilities and reduce the risks of hazardous chemicals to facility workers and operators, communities, and responders. These efforts represent a shared commitment among those with a stake in chemical facility safety and security: facility owners and operators; federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial governments; regional entities; nonprofit organizations; facility workers; first responders; environmental justice and local environmental organizations; and communities. In FY 2016, we are implementing actions to strengthen community planning and preparedness, enhance federal operational coordination, improve data management, modernize policies and regulation, and incorporate stakeholder feedback and best practices.

Protecting Our Land
EPA strives to protect and restore land to create a safer environment for all Americans by cleaning up hazardous and non-hazardous wastes that can migrate to air, groundwater and surface water, contaminating drinking water supplies, causing acute illnesses and chronic diseases, and threatening healthy ecosystems. We preserve, restore, and protect our land, for both current and future generations by cleaning up contaminated sites and returning them to communities for reuse. Our funds will assist communities in using existing infrastructure and planning for more efficient and livable communities, and encouraging the minimization of environmental impacts throughout the full life cycle of materials. In FY 2016, we will increase the Superfund Remedial program by $34 million to accelerate the pace of cleanups, supporting states, local communities, and tribes in their efforts to assess and cleanup sites and return them to productive reuse, and encourage renewable energy development on formerly hazardous sites when appropriate. We will expand the successful Brownfields program, providing grants, and supporting area-wide planning and technical assistance to maximize the benefits to the communities. In FY 2016, the EPA is investing $110 million in funding for Brownfields Project grants to local communities, an additional $30 million over the FY 2015 Enacted Budget, increasing the number of grants for assessment and cleanup of contaminated sites. This investment builds on the program’s successful community-driven approach to revitalizing contaminated land and further supports the Agency’s efforts to make a visible difference in communities.

Ensuring the Safety of Chemicals and Preventing Pollution
EPA’s chemical safety programs are at the forefront of its efforts to advance a sustainable future. In FY 2016, we are requesting $667.9 million, an increase of $47.4 million over the FY 2015 Enacted Budget, to develop new computational tools, and expand and enhance the quality, accessibility, and usefulness of information about commercial chemicals and pesticides, thereby strengthening the capability of the EPA, other regulators, and the public to assess chemical hazards and potential exposures, identify potential risks to human health and the environment and take appropriate risk management action. The EPA will work aggressively to ensure sound science, complete additional risk assessments from the TSCA Work Plan list of existing chemicals and meet its requirement to review all current pesticide registrations by 2022. In FY 2016, the EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs will continue the important work initiated by the Presidential Memorandum to Promote the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators to reverse pollinator losses and help restore populations to healthy levels. The EPA is committing $2 million towards this effort: $1.5 million to further the study of acute toxicity amongst honey bee populations and explore additional risk management options, and $500,000 to augment the work of States and Tribes to develop pollinator protection plans.

Continuing EPA’s Commitment to Innovative Research & Development
Environmental issues in the 21st century are complex because of the interplay between air quality, climate change, water quality, healthy communities, and chemical safety. They require different thinking and solutions than those used in the past. The EPA’s Office of Research and Development is strengthening the Agency’s ability to develop solutions by providing $528 million to evaluate and predict potential environmental and human health impacts for decision makers at all levels of government. Activities in the FY 2016 Budget include providing support tools for community health, investigating the unique properties of emerging materials, such as nanomaterials, and research to support the nation’s range of growing water-use and ecological requirements. 

Supporting State and Tribal Partners
Effective environmental protection is a joint effort of EPA, states and our tribal partners. In FY 2016, we are requesting an increase of $108 million in funding for State and Tribal Assistance categorical grants and setting a high bar for continuing our partnership efforts with states and tribes. We are also including opportunities for closer collaboration and targeted joint planning and governance processes. One example is the commitment to work collaboratively to streamline, reform, and integrate our shared business processes and related systems through the E-Enterprise approach. State-EPA-Tribal joint governance serves to organize the E-Enterprise partnership to elevate its visibility, boost coordination capacity, and ensure the inclusiveness and effectiveness of shared process and management improvements. This will yield the benefits of increased transparency, efficiency, and burden reduction for communities, businesses, and government agencies when implemented. 

Maintaining a Forward Looking and Adaptive EPA
The EPA has strategically evaluated its workforce and facility needs and will continue the comprehensive effort to optimize and update its physical footprint. In 2016, we will fast-track our efforts to save taxpayer dollars through space optimization and essential renovations, including the important laboratory buildings across the country, without sacrificing high quality of research. The agency will continue to improve our processes and the business enterprise of environmental protection for regulated companies and the public through the joint E-Enterprise effort with states to leverage technology and streamline workflow, data quality, data sharing and transparency.

Reducing and Eliminating ProgramsThe EPA continues to examine its programs to find those that have served their purpose and accomplished their mission. The FY 2016 President’s Budget also eliminates a number of programs totaling $44 million. Details are found in the EPA FY 2016 Congressional Justification.http://www2.epa.gov/planandbudget/fy2016).

For more information on the EPA’s FY 2016 proposed budget, please visithttp://www2.epa.gov/planandbudget/fy2016.

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News Release: EPA News Advisory: ASIG Sand Island Fuel Spill Response Update 2/2/15
For Immediate Release: February 2, 2015
Media Contact:           Dean Higuchi, 808-541-2711higuchi.dean@epa.gov                                  

EPA News Advisory
ASIG Sand Island Fuel Spill Response Update 2/2/15

HONOLULU – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) continue response operations to recover spilled jet fuel at the Airport Service Group International (ASIG) facility on Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. EPA is leading the response effort and working with DOH’s Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response branch and ASIG

Status of Response - 2/2/15

Amount of fuel recovered:
Response activities have resulted in the recovery of over 19,800 gallons of spilled jet fuel, with fuel recovery continuing.

Accomplished and Ongoing response activities:
In the past week 15 exploratory trenches and 5 monitoring bore holes have been dug inside the tank farm. Two of several planned fuel extraction trenches have been installed inside the tank farm. These trenches are designed to optimize capture of the fuel inside the perimeter wall. A total of 42 exploratory bore holes have been dug outside the tank farm to define and monitor the offsite jet fuel plume.

The ongoing recovery effort includes pumping fuel from extraction trenches and tank monitoring wells. Work continues in monitoring the extent of the spill, and to contain and remove the spilled fuel to reduce impact to the environment.

Status of fuel migration off-site:
Fuel has been detected off site of the facility through subsurface contamination about 150 feet from the water. Spill containment booms have been deployed in the waters near the facility as a precaution. The booms on the water are monitored daily for any signs of fuel, and there is no indication that the spill has migrated into the near shore waters or entered Keehi Lagoon.

DOH has reported that the fuel spill has not affected harbor activities and there are no closures.  Boaters, fishermen, pier construction workers, office workers, wildlife and marine life are safe from the fuel spill as the fuel is underground. There are no drinking water wells in the area.

Future Planned Actions:

Once the extraction trenches inside the facility are able to maintain hydraulic control of the release and demonstrate containment of the spill, a system to extract fuel outside the facility will be built. This system may include pumping from bore holes and/or an extraction trench or trenches. Also, in order to ensure containment of the off-site plume, an interceptor trench will be installed the full length of the area of concern between the onsite extraction trenches and the waterfront.

Response Background Information:

EPA Order – January 30
EPA issued an Clean Water Act compliance order on January 30 that requires ASIG, the facility operator, and Hawaii Fueling Facilities Corp., the facility owner, to submit to EPA by Feb. 5 a work plan for daily response activities, clean up all petroleum or contaminated materials released to the environment as a result of the spill, prevent further releases and impacts to the environment resulting from releases of oil/fuel to waters and adjoining shorelines, repair all damaged equipment at the facility to prevent future spills of petroleum, and submit a plan by Mar. 2 for confirmatory sampling to ensure that the cleanup activities are complete.

Spill Background
The ASIG reported to DOH that the 42,000 gallon spill was the result of a leak in the bottom of ASIG’s Tank #2. The above ground storage tank has a 2.8 million gallon capacity. The ASIG facility has 16 above ground tanks with a total facility capacity of 44.8 million gallons of fuel and supplies fuel to the Honolulu International Airport.
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News Release: U.S. EPA, Air District Unveil Air Monitor at Busiest US-Mexico Border Crossing
For Immediate Release: February 3, 2015
Media Contacts:
U.S. EPA: Nahal Mogharabi, 213-244-1815Mogharabi.nahal@epa.gov
San Diego APCD: Michael Drake, 858-495-5736Michael.Drake@sdcounty.ca.gov  
 
U.S. EPA, Air District Unveil Air Monitor at Busiest US-Mexico Border Crossing
Monitor will help understand pollution at San Ysidro Port of Entry
LOS ANGELES— Today, U.S. EPA, along with the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD) will unveil a new air pollution monitor at the San Ysidro port of entry, located on the US-Mexico border about 16 miles from downtown San Diego. 50,000 cars and buses and 25,000 pedestrians cross there daily, making it the busiest land port of entry in the Western Hemisphere.
The monitor measures PM 2.5 (fine particulate matter up to 2.5 microns in diameter), which can result in negative health effects when inhaled. The device, which begins operating today, will be used to collect real time data on the levels of air pollutants in San Ysidro and adjoining communities. EPA is providing $110,000 to the SDAPCD for the two year project that includes the purchase, installation, and operation of the monitor.  At the conclusion of the study, if PM 2.5 levels are elevated, the District and EPA will identify its sources and work to reduce it where possible. 
“Air pollution knows no boundaries,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “The goal is to protect our communities near the border through a better understanding of the soot that may be affecting San Ysidro, whether from tailpipe emissions or wood smoke.”  
In collaboration with the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the monitor has been placed on the roof of the pedestrian building at the port of entry. Data from the monitor are posted on the SDAPCD website and will be used to help address air pollution challenges in nearby communities. At the completion of the monitoring period, the EPA and SDAPCD will analyze the data and determine next steps. The closest PM 2.5 monitor is in Chula Vista, Calif., about 6 miles north of the port of entry, and does not provide data representative of PM 2.5 emissions at the Border.
“This air pollution monitor will allow us to track San Ysidro’s air quality and craft solutions to improve the air that local residents breathe,” said County Supervisor Greg Cox, who represents the area.
Binational environmental pollution is addressed through the Border 2020 Environment Program - a bi-national collaborative effort with a mission to protect human health and the environment along the U.S.–Mexico border.  To date, EPA has invested over $600 million in border environmental projects.   For more about EPA’s Border 2020 Program, please visit: www.epa.gov/border2020
PM 2.5 is one of the most pressing challenges to clean air today. When inhaled, this complex mixture of extremely small particles can reach the deepest regions of the lungs. Health studies have shown a significant association between exposure to fine particles and premature death from heart or lung disease. 
Air pollution presents a substantial environmental risk in some border communities that are frequently exposed to elevated concentrations of particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5, ozone, and toxic air pollutants. Communities that deal with multiple environmental stressors are often disadvantaged and more vulnerable to the impacts of air pollution. The border region includes a number of cities that share common airsheds; thus, activities in one city can directly affect the other, whether in the same country or across the border.
To access the AirNow website, please visit: http://sd.sdapcd.org/Airvision/
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News Alert: Administrator McCarthy to Testify in Front of House-Senate Joint Hearing on the Clean Water Rule
CONTACT:
Robert Daguillard
Daguillard.robert@epa.gov
202-564-6618 (offc)
202-360-0476 (cell)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 4, 2015
Administrator McCarthy to Testify in Front of House-Senate Joint Hearing on the Clean Water Rule
WASHINGTON –  U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy and Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) Jo-Ellen Darcy will testify today in front of the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure on the proposed Clean Water Rule.
Sixty percent of streams and millions of acres of wetlands across the country aren’t clearly protected from pollution and destruction. One in three Americans get their drinking water from these streams that are vulnerable. To have clean water downstream in the rivers and lakes in our neighborhoods we need healthy headwaters upstream. That is why the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have proposed to strengthen protections for the clean water that is vital to all Americans.
WHEN:           February 4, 10:00 a.m. ET           
WHAT: ​          Joint Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on the Clean Water Rule
WHO:            US EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy
                     Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) Jo-Ellen Darcy
WHERE:        House Visitors Center of the U.S. Capitol (HVC 210) 
RSVP:           Due to limited seating, members of the media interested in covering the hearing should RSVP toJustin.Harclerode@mail.house.gov.

The hearing will be streamed live here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYB8iQ-3sgo 
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News Brief: EPA Finalizes Updates to Air Standards for Future Wood Heaters
CONTACT: 
Enesta Jones
202.564.4355

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 4, 2015

EPA Finalizes Updates to Air Standards for Future Wood Heaters
 Phased-in updates will ensure a smooth transition to cleaner and more efficient wood heaters

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is finalizing standards to limit the amount of pollution that wood heaters, which will be manufactured and sold in the future, can emit. These standards, which were last updated in 1988, reflect the significantly improved technology that is now available to make a range of models cleaner burning and more efficient. Today’s final rule will provide important health benefits to communities across the country and will be phased in over a five-year period, giving manufacturers time to adapt their product lines to develop the best next-generation models to meet these new standards. The final rule does not affect current heaters already in use in homes today. It also does not replace state or local requirements governing wood heater use. Instead, it ensures that consumers buying wood heaters anywhere in the United States in the future will be able to choose from cleaner-burning models.
Wood heaters, which are used around the clock in some areas, can increase particle pollution, sometimes called soot to levels that pose serious health concerns. Particle pollution is linked to a wide range of serious health effects, including heart attacks, strokes and asthma attacks. People with heart, vascular or lung disease, older adults and children are the most at risk from particle pollution exposure.Smoke from wood heaters also includes volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide and air toxics. EPA’s updated standards will build on the work that states and local communities have done to improve air quality in these communities and are based on significant improvements in technology. 
Emissions from new models will be reduced by roughly two-thirds, improving air quality and providing between $3.4 and $7.6 billion in public health benefits. This means that for every dollar spent to bring cleaner heaters to market, the American public will see between $74 and $165 in health benefits. Consumers purchasing new models will also benefit from efficiency improvements, which means they will use less wood to heat their homes. Consumers can play an important role in cutting pollution by following the guidelines in their owner’s manuals and following best burning practices available on EPA’s website.
EPA conducted extensive public outreach as it developed the proposed rule, seeking input from numerous wood heater manufacturers, state, local and tribal governments, regional air quality agencies, and citizen and environmental groups. The agency also participated in a Small Business Advocacy Review Panel to seek input and advice as it developed the proposed rule.
Based on public comment on the proposal and additional information submitted to the agency, the agency’s final standards make a number of important updates from the proposal including changes to provide manufacturers the time and flexibility they need to ensure a smooth transition to cleaner heaters. EPA is also updating the final emissions limits to reflect changes the agency made to the emissions test method requirements based on input received during the comment period.

The Clean Air Act requires EPA to set new source performance standards (NSPS) for categories of stationary sources of pollution that cause, or significantly contribute to, air pollution that may endanger public health or welfare. The agency’s final rule announced today updates the 1988 standards for woodstoves and sets the first-ever federal standards for hydronic heaters, wood-fired forced air furnaces (also called warm-air furnaces), pellet stoves and a previously unregulated type of woodstove called a single burn-rate stove. These standards do not cover fireplaces, fire pits, pizza ovens, barbecues or chimineas.

EPA received nearly 8,000 comments on the proposed rule and held one public hearing.
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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency News Releases: New England Region (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT, 10 tribes) Update : EPA Welcomes New “Top Cop” for Criminal Enforcement Program in New England
News Release
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
New England Regional Office
February 5, 2015
Contact: David Deegan, (617) 918-1017

EPA Welcomes New “Top Cop” for Criminal Enforcement Program in New England
BOSTON – Tyler Amon, a 20-year veteran of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Criminal Enforcement, has been selected as the new Special Agent-in-Charge of its Area Office in Boston. He will supervise all environmental crimes investigations throughout EPA’s Region 1 jurisdiction, encompassing Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont.

Amon joined EPA’s Office of Criminal Enforcement in 1995. Immediately prior to being named Special Agent-in-Charge of the Boston Office, he served as Special-Agent-in-Charge in EPA’s Region 10 office in Seattle since June 2010. Earlier in his career, Amon has worked at EPA’s Office of Criminal Enforcement in Washington, D.C., the Charlotte, N.C. Resident Office and the Dallas, Texas Area Office. He is a graduate of Colgate University in Hamilton, N.Y.

“Having grown up in New England, it is a special honor to serve as a leader entrusted with protecting the public from environmental criminals,” said Amon. “I look forward to working with the many federal, State and local officials that bring environmental violators to justice.”
“Tyler represents what EPA’s criminal enforcement program is all about – a vigorous pursuit of environmental crimes to protect communities and businesses that play by the rules,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for enforcement and compliance assurance at EPA. “Tyler is tough and fair, and he’ll take these qualities that he honed in EPA’s Seattle office to the important work in the New England region.”
“Our criminal enforcement officers are on the front line, protecting peoples’ health and our communities,” said Curt Spalding, regional administrator of EPA’s New England office. “We are very proud to welcome Tyler Amon back to New England. Our citizens will be well-served by such a well-seasoned and dedicated public servant.”
EPA’s Office of Criminal Enforcement, established in 1983, includes nearly 180 criminal investigators -- federal agents with full law enforcement authority who are highly trained and committed to protecting human health and the environment. An Area Office under the supervision of a Special-Agent-in-Charge is located in each of EPA’s ten regional offices, with smaller resident offices in several dozen other locations across the country.
Recent EPA criminal enforcement actions by in New England include:
    - an individual in Methuen, Mass. sentenced to more than seven years in prison for an asbestos training scam,
    - Unilever paying $4.5 million and pleading guilty to two counts of knowingly violating the Clean Water Act at a Connecticut facility, and
    - on Tuesday of this week, former Berkshire Power employees were charged in an air pollution scheme for tampering with environmental monitors in violation of the Clean Air Act.
Criminal Investigation Division (CID) mission is to investigate allegations of the most egregious violations of the federal environmental statutes, and to assist the Department of Justice in the prosecution of individuals and corporations charged with criminal offenses.
More information on EPA’s investigations of criminal environmental crimes: http://www2.epa.gov/enforcement/criminal-enforcement
#  #  #

News Release: EPA News Advisory: ASIG Sand Island Fuel Spill Response Update 2/6/15
For Immediate Release: February 6, 2015
Media Contact:           Dean Higuchi, 808-541-2711higuchi.dean@epa.gov                                  

EPA News Advisory
ASIG Sand Island Fuel Spill Response Update 2/6/15

HONOLULU – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) continue response operations to recover spilled jet fuel at the Airport Service Group International (ASIG) facility on Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. EPA is leading the response effort and working with DOH’s Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response branch and ASIG.

NEW- Please visit EPA’s ASIG Sand Island Fuel Spill Response site for news releases and photos: http://www.epa.gov/region9/mediacenter/sand-island/

Status of Response - 2/6/15

Amount of fuel recovered:
Response activities have resulted in the recovery of over 18,640 gallons of spilled jet fuel, with fuel recovery continuing. The fuel recovery number has been revised from the previous reported figure to account for the de-watering of the fuel that is necessary during the fuel recovery process.

Current response activities:
-Jet fuel recovery has begun outside of the facility with extraction wells recovering jet fuel that migrated off-site.

-A work plan has been submitted on time by ASIG as per the Jan. 30 EPA order.

-Design and planning has been completed for an interceptor trench to insure that the jet fuel plume does not reach the near shore waters or Keehi Lagoon. This be installed the full length of the area of concern between the onsite extraction trenches and the waterfront.

-There continues to be no indication the spilled fuel has moved any closer to the near shore waters or Keehi Lagoon

The ongoing recovery effort includes fuel being pumped from three extraction trenches and a few small open pits inside the facility, and two well locations outside the facility, directly into vacuum trucks. The vacuum truck loads are taken offsite for processing at the Honolulu Airport fuel storage farm.

Status of fuel migration off-site:
Fuel has been detected off site of the facility through subsurface contamination about 150 feet from the water. Spill containment booms have been deployed in the waters near the facility as a precaution. The booms on the water are monitored daily for any signs of fuel, and there is no indication that the spill has migrated into the near shore waters or entered Keehi Lagoon.

DOH has reported that the fuel spill has not affected harbor activities and there are no closures.  Boaters, fishermen, pier construction workers, office workers, wildlife and marine life are safe from the fuel spill as the fuel is underground. There are no drinking water wells in the area.

Future Planned Actions:

Fuel recovery work will continue inside the facility. Fuel recovery work outside of the facility has started removing fuel that has migrated off site.


Response Background Information:

EPA Order – January 30
EPA issued an Clean Water Act compliance order on January 30 that requires ASIG, the facility operator, and Hawaii Fueling Facilities Corp., the facility owner, to submit to EPA by Feb. 5 a work plan for daily response activities, clean up all petroleum or contaminated materials released to the environment as a result of the spill, prevent further releases and impacts to the environment resulting from releases of oil/fuel to waters and adjoining shorelines, repair all damaged equipment at the facility to prevent future spills of petroleum, and submit a plan by Mar. 2 for confirmatory sampling to ensure that the cleanup activities are complete.

Spill Background
The ASIG reported to DOH that the 42,000 gallon spill was the result of a leak in the bottom of ASIG’s Tank #2. The above ground storage tank has a 2.8 million gallon capacity. The ASIG facility has 16 above ground tanks with a total facility capacity of 44.8 million gallons of fuel and supplies fuel to the Honolulu International Airport.